Samuel Scheidt: Notes and Commentary

Samuel Scheidt was a German composer, organist, and teacher of the early Baroque era. He studied with Jan Sweelinck, the distinguished Dutch composer, whose work had a clear influence on Scheidt’s style. Scheidt was the first internationally significant German composer for the organ, and represents the flowering of the new north German style, which occurred largely as a result of the Protestant Reformation. In south Germany and some other countries of Europe, the spiritual and artistic influence of Rome remained strong, so most music continued to be derivative of Italian models. Cut off from Rome, musicians in the newly Protestant areas readily developed styles that were much different from those of their neighbors.

Scheidt’s music is in two principal categories: instrumental music, including a large amount of keyboard music, mostly for organ; and sacred vocal music, some of which is a cappella and some of which uses a basso continuo or other instrumental accompaniment. In his numerous chorale preludes, Scheidt often used a “patterned variation” technique, in which each phrase of the chorale uses a different rhythmic motive, and each variation is more elaborate than the previous one, until the climax of the composition is reached. In addition to his chorale preludes, he wrote numerous fugues, suites of dances (which were often in a cyclic form, sharing a common ground bass) and fantasias. He lived from November 1587 to March 24, 1654.—Excerpted from Wikipedia

Samuel Scheidt Books and Music
More on Scheidt
Back to home page

Advertisements

Comments are closed.